(previous session)

Matt Hirschey (Verdin Lab, UCSF-Gladstone): Lack of SIRT3 results in the metabolic syndrome. SIRT3 is a mitochondrial sirtuin (NAD+-dependent deacetylase) that is upregulated in liver upon fasting; knockout mice (SIRT3KO) are grossly normal but have trouble with lipid metabolism (specifically, beta-oxidation). Hershey identified several mitochondrial proteins involved in lipid oxidation that are deacetylated in response to fasting, in wildtype but not SIRT3KO. The knockouts are prone to developing obesity and metabolic syndrome with age.

Kate Brown (Chen lab, UC-Berkeley): Calorie restriction reduces oxidative stress by inducing SIRT3. Beginning with an invocation of the free radical theory of aging, and the observation that calorie restriction (CR) reduces oxidative stress, Brown asked whether the mitochondrial sirtuin SIRT3 could be involved in resistance to reactive oxygen species. She showed that CR induces SIRT3 expression, and that the SIRT3 protein deacetylates the mitochondrial antioxidant enzyme SOD2. Furthermore, consistent with Subhash Katewa’s talk in the first session, she demonstrated that CR reduces oxidative stress by switching from glucose to fatty acid oxidation, and that this switch requires SIRT3 activity.

(We’ve discussed SIRT3 before, most recently regarding its role as a tumor suppressor and also with respect to its relationship with exercise).

Ruth Tennen (Chua lab, Stanford): Insight into SIRT6 function at telomeres and beyond. Another member of the sirtuin family, SIRT6, is not localized to mitochondria but rather to telomeres, where it maintains telomeric chromatin in a healthy state and regulates the activity of the senescence-associated transcription factor NF-κB – for more background, see this previous post.) Tennen has shown that SIRT6 is involved in regulating the telomere position effect (TPE) – the silencing of gene expression caused by proximity to a telomere. The TPE has been implicated in age-related changes in gene expression: as telomeres shorten over time, telomere-proximal genes are aberrantly expressed — meanwhile, silencing factors are liberated to wander throughout the genome, repressing genes that should be turned on; similar logic has been applied to the relationship between DNA damage and transcriptional dysregulation.

Jue Lin (Blackburn Lab, UCSF): Telomere length maintenance and aging-related diseases. This talk described work that builds on significant progress, from this lab and others, demonstrating relationships between telomere length and stress, psychological outlook, and lifespan. Lin reviewed evidence that perceived stress is correlated with telomere length in white blood cells (consistent with previous results showing a relationship with intrusive thoughts). New-to-me data included a demonstration that people who increased omega-3 levels or made favorable lifestyle changes exhibited a slower rate of telomere shortening.

(next session)

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