My former collaborator, Professor Hao Li of UCSF’s Department of Biopharmaceutical Sciences, is looking for a postdoc to lead a project on “genomic approaches to understanding the mechanisms of aging,” using yeast as the model organism.

Candidates should have an interest in genomics and training in yeast as an experimental system. The project will involve analyzing the yeast proteome using tagged libraries and flow-cytometric methods, and will also involve design, development and implementation of microfluidics assays suitable for assaying yeast lifespan. Details of the project are still very much in a dynamic state, so there’s lots of room for creativity and input from the person who eventually takes the position.

Inquiries to haoli@genome.ucsf.edu.

The Li lab began as a primarily computational lab (the mission statement on Hao’s faculty page describes the group’s mission as “Development of theoretical and computational tools to extract biological information from genome sequences and the large quantity of data generated from experiments facilitated by various genome projects”), but in the past few years has definitely moved in a more experimental direction. Furthermore, the UCSF Tetrad program (the effectively borderless amalgam of departments and programs in which the Li lab operates) is a very collaborative environment, in which labs exchange knowledge and expertise very willingly. So this would be a great spot for a yeast biologist looking to add more quantitative and genome-scale approaches to their work.

(Speaking from my own direct experience, Hao is a great person to work with, and the UCSF Mission Bay campus is as close to scientific paradise as I’ve ever come.)