I’ve finally gotten around to registering this website at ResearchBlogging.org:

ResearchBlogging.org is a system for identifying the best, most thoughtful blog posts about peer-reviewed research.

Since many blogs combine serious posts with more personal or frivolous posts, our site offers a way to find only the most carefully-crafted posts about cutting-edge research, often written by experts in their respective fields.

Originally I resisted signing up, on the grounds that — after all! — every post on Ouroboros was about peer-reviewed papers (or at least papers from peer-reviewed journals; many reviews, despite their name, don’t undergo the same type of review as primary research papers). Hence, flagging posts about the peer-reviewed literature would be redundant. Simple inspection proves that this premise was false, so I’ve stopped worrying and learned to love yet another blog post aggregator.

The only difference to the user is that there will be a citation block at the bottom of any post about a scholarly paper (e.g., see here).

For those of you who are interested, there’s a ResearchBlogging.org link in the “Feeds etc.” section on the right-hand margin of the front page, which will take you to a tabulated list of all Ouroboros posts about scholarly papers. I am probably not going to go back and retroactively tag every qualified post, but as of now, future posts about papers will end up on that list.

I would also encourage readers of Ouroboros to go and explore ResearchBlogging.org‘s main site: The overall scientific caliber of the participating blogs is quite high, and it’s an increasingly user-configurable experience: You can use tags to read posts from the fields of greatest interest to you (e.g., biology). Likewise, you can subscribe to an aggregated RSS feed consisting of all posts in that field (again, e.g., biology). The system isn’t perfect yet — you can’t yet aggregate only those posts about sub-categories like “Biochemistry” or “Aging,” and they’ve made the weird decision to aggregate all posts tagged as Other, but in general it’s a nice service and I think readers of this blog will find it useful.